A Sketch of Bible History

Biblos means little books. People often wonder about how the 80 books of the King James version (1611) of the Bible came about. Probably there the Pentateuch (first five books of the Bible- Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy) were collected in various parchments, scrolls, scripts from a number of sources and collated by Moses. As a son of Pharaoh he had the education and means to gather his Jewish brother’s and sister’s tribal history records. Yet there were probably others in Israel and Judah that kept records. Moses probably invented the alpha beth as a phonetic upgrade over the Egyptian hieroglyphs.

Moses prophesied himself that there would be a Jewish leader who would devote himself to working on all of the material of Moses. He was probably pointing to King David. David probably commissioned the formal construction of standardized, collated Old Testament Biblical material of the day and the work likely continued into the court of Rehoboam his son.

Biblical scholars have found that the book of Genesis was worked on at different times by four writers known as the J, E, P and D writers.

The earliest is the J writer. He or she probably was the first and worked for David or Rehoboam.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elohist

The Court of King David was circa 1050 b.c. Moses was circa 1450 b.c., and Abraham about 2000 b.c. So one can see that a thousand years passed for the material to gather. The Hebrew language was only started around the b.c. 1400s. Before that maybe oral poems recorded social and religious history. It is no wonder then that King David wrote the psalms as prose-poem-song lyrics.

The last book of the Old Testament is that of Malachi written about 425 b.c. The final book of the New Testament is The Revelation believed written by John sometime in the first century a.d.- about 500 years after the book of Malachi.

http://jesusalive.cc/ques272.htm Old Testament chronology

The oldest complete New Testament is the Codex Siniaticus from the 4th century a.d. (300s). There are fragments from the 2nd century a.d.

http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=aa11

I put together a free book that goes over some New Testament material that is interesting regarding the writers of the New Testament.

http://www.lulu.com/shop/garrison-clifford-gibson/a-commentary-on-berkhofs-intro-to-the-new-testament/ebook/product-21420051.html