The Past Participle of Broken 2022

A broke revolt? Apparently it isn’t proper to say “it’s broke” in reply to a question like “Does you’re economic policy work?” How can Americans accept that broke means having no money and can’t be used to directly say that something is shattered, in pieces, fractured or busted up? The year two thousand and twenty two had an economy somewhat broken by a foreign war whole-heartedly supported by Democrats. Oil rose in price with sanctions on Russia and inflation hit Americans that aren’t rich rather solidly. One hopes the distinction of being broke is not lost on those in government that might misunderstand the correct way to avoid being broke. Breaking a political economy can leave a nation broke.

With wrong economic macro-management the government could break the economy and leave itself broke simulatenously. Broke and broken would be a fullfillment of the logical extrapolation of the David Stockman conundrum regarding deficit spend perhaps including the recently signed-in-to-law 1.7 trillion dollar extra federal budget bill. Once upon a time nearly a couple of trillion dollars was considered real money.

It is o.k. to say that one broke something- like writing a budget leaving government broke as a past participle of break. In other words if one is an economist broken upon the wheel the poor soul would be broken and if not awash with cash, perhaps broke too. I hope that makes it perfectly clear. Broke means without money more or less and broken is the right word for poorly designed political economies that don’t work.

Drill sergeants used to refer to injured personnel as ‘broke dicks’. Maybe that use is some sort of pronoun. Bob Dylan wrote a song about things broken. His english was correct.


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